Archive | October, 2016

Goodbye Schools Challenge Cymru

19 Oct

“Endings to be useful must be inconclusive” – Samuel R. Delany

I wrote an article for the Institute of Welsh Affairs back in August questioning if Schools Challenge Cymru was going to be given enough time to prove itself a positive policy.  The answer came in yesterday’s budget when the policy was no where to be seen.

Now, on one hand analysis of the policy suggests it has not created a significant uplift in the way some had envisaged at this stage.  The independent review referenced in my IWA piece presents quite a mixed picture of SCC.  Clearly it hasn’t been a big bang impact of intervention.  However, I’ve never expect that it would be.  We are only a few years into the programme and examples from London and Manchester suggested that similar systems took years to wield the sort of results we would want to see.  While no one would want to see such a significant amount of money invested in a project that doesn’t deliver, there are questions to be asked about if Schools Challenge Cymru has been given the necessary time to prove itself.  It also puts doubts in the minds of those in the sector around the viability and longevity of future policies.  It is getting harder and harder to convince teachers to become invested in embracing a new approach when experience tells them they will be starting afresh in a few weeks, months or years.  For example, how do we know if future policies, such as the reduction of class sizes, will also be funded long enough to ascertain if they will create a tangible benefit for Wales.

Given that it has been brought to an end what is important now is that we ensure that the funding for it is diverted to other important areas within the education portfolio, and that those schools who were involved with the Schools Challenge Cymru policy are continued to be supported in other ways in future.  The additional finance provided within the Pupil Deprivation Grant is certainly a positive step forward.

The Stats Behind the Profession – Part 3

18 Oct

Following my previous posts about the numbers and gender of teachers in Wales I wanted to look in this blog at the ethnic group and national identity of our school staff.

I did blog a while back asking the question if our classrooms reflected our communities. With that as a background it is interesting to look into the stats compiled by the EWC.

We can see from the EWC annual digest that 86.1% of teachers in Wales identify themselves as ‘White:British.’  That is actually below the make up of our communities according to the 2011 census, in which 93.2% identified themselves in such a way.  What is perhaps interesting is that between 2001-2011 that ‘White:British’ population in Wales decreased while the EWC stats show there has been an annual increase in that ethnic group registering as teachers annually between 2012-2016.  To be clear, on both counts we are talking marginal changes.

One group we are clearly failing to entice into teaching is the Asian (Pakistani, Indian & Bangladeshi) communities.  EWC stats show individuals from this ethnic group make up just 0.2% of registered teachers, while the census notes they make up 2.3% of wider Welsh society.

It is evident that overall the teaching profession in Wales is roughly representative of ethnic backgrounds with Welsh census data.  However, in an ever more multicultural society, and certainly in a post-Brexit world of racial tensions, we should be reaching out and ensuring that teaching is a profession which is open to attracting the creative and enthusiastic talents from right across community backgrounds.

The Stats Behind The Profession – Part 2

17 Oct

Last week I published a blog looking at the numbers of teachers registered with the Education Workforce Council in their annual statistics digest.  In this blog I’m going to look at the gender breakdown.

I’ve blogged in the past about the lack of gender equality in our classrooms.  It is an issue that the EWC, in their former guise the GTCW, have raised in the past.  I feel the lack of male teachers is not only hindering the ability of Welsh schools to establish a more balanced workforce, but it also is part of the reason we have a disproportionate number of men leading schools.

The stats published in this years digest suggest that far from tackling the shortfall we are continuing to see a decline.

March 2012 – 25% of the teaching workforce were men.

March 2013 – 24.8% of the teaching workforce were men.

March 2014 – 24.7% of the teaching workforce were men.

March 2015 – 24.6% of the teaching workforce were men.

March 2016 – 24.6% of the teaching workforce were men.

While the percentage remained static between 2015-2016 due to a reduction overall in the number of teachers there was actually a decline in the number of male teachers registered with the EWC.  The hard facts are that in 2012 we  had a total of 9,589 male teachers from a registered number of 38,290.  As of this years publication that has dropped by nearly 500 to a total of 9,092 from 36,951.

This is an issue that I have raised in the past, and many others have also.  It appears that despite those numerous and widespread soundings, and in some cases actual campaigns on the issue, the low intake of male teachers continues to be evident in our professional make up.

The Stats Behind The Profession – Part 1

14 Oct

Recently the Education Workforce Council (EWC) published their annual statistics digest.  Much of it is expected and bland but there are a few headline figures worth picking out for discussion and I am going to do that over a few different blogs.

The first stat is just the basic numbers of teachers registered with the EWC.

March 2012 – 38,290

March 2013 – 37,862

March 2014 – 37,673

March 2015 – 37,355

March 2016 – 36,951

Slowly over the past five years we have seen a decline of -1,339 in registered teachers.  I should say that Stats Wales records the number of qualified teachers by local authority as 27,738.  I’m a little unsure as to why there is a discrepancy although I’m guessing that the Stats Wales figures do not include things such as registered teachers working in different areas outside the classroom (local authorities; consortia; Welsh Government etc.) nor perhaps more specifically supply teachers.

This decline may not seem such a big deal.  We are not talking about a huge percentage of the teaching profession and historically Wales has over subscribed its teaching places.  However, we are creeping towards a potential issue in that not once since 2010 has the target number for teacher training places been met.  Worryingly the shortfall has steadily grown with a third of teacher training places remaining unfilled in 2015/16.  We are facing the very real possibility that we could go from training too many teachers to failing to train enough.  That is already a factor in some specific areas such as maths, sciences and modern foreign languages but it could develop into a wider concern.

So why is this happening?  I think it is perhaps a three fold issue.  Firstly changes made to the entry requirements have seen those applying needing a B grade in English and mathematics rather than the previously required C grade.  I can, in some senses, see the logic of raising the bar on that expectation but at the same time I remain unconvinced it was the wisest move.  It has established a qualification expectation on an individual based on an exam they will have done at least 5/6 years prior to becoming a teacher.  In the interim they will have secured higher level qualifications.  What is more, that someone has a B grade above a C grade does not necessarily make them a better teacher.  Teaching is as much an art as it is a science and, as I stated at the time, I still have reservations that potentially very good teachers have been vetoed from taking the role up because of this barrier.

Secondly, is the issue of workload and the remuneration of teachers.  Teachers workload has been a major concern for as long as you could care to remember.  Teachers have always gone above and beyond but what was once done in addition to their expected contracts due to a love of the role, has now become an unwritten obligation.  More worryingly it is a case of those working hours being a necessity in order to cover the bureaucracy that goes hand in hand with the role.  Unless a teacher is still working late into each evening and often over the weekend they simply can not sustain the levels of workload required to reach ever unrealistic targets, both for them personally and their pupils.  At the same time we have seen the pay and pensions of teachers depressed and devalued while access to those pensions now comes with an additional several years of employment or else financial penalty.  Teachers are having to work more for less and that does nothing to entice people into the profession.  Put together with the first concern and what we are expecting is a better standard of teacher (on paper if not in reality) to do more work and get paid less for it.  It is little wonder recruitment is beginning to become an issue.

Perhaps the final issue with teacher numbers is that the role of a teacher has been denigrated in the eyes of the public.  While surveys consistently show trust in the teaching profession remains high, the respect that teaching as a profession gets from the media and politicians has, as a rule of thumb, decreased.  I should caveat that by saying I know there are great journalists and many politicians who speak highly of teachers and promote their role in our society.  However, overall there is no underestimating the way teachers have been under attack in recent years as the narrative for governmental and policy failure, at both ends of the M4, has been focused on blaming classroom practitioners.  The more the reputation of teachers is damaged the less attractive the position will seem to potential applicants.