The Williams Deal

27 May

I found this Western Mail article really noteworthy this week.  Ignoring the politics of the alleged Labour fallout, albeit that is of course interesting, what struck me is the concessions negotiated by Kirsty Williams.  For someone who does not bring Labour a majority these 9 key announcements are pretty impressive.  Accepting of course that some will be policies that Labour are happy to deliver, and indeed may have done so regardless of the Lib Dem role in cabinet, there still remains some big areas for Kirsty Williams to claim as victories.

The infant class size reduction is a major win.  This was arguably the key election pledge of the Lib Dems in their election manifesto.  What is more it is a policy that has been criticised and opposed by both the previous Labour Education Ministers who disputed the impact smaller class sizes would have on standards.  It begs the question perhaps if such a deal would have been feasible had either, or both, returned to Cardiff Bay for this term.

The policy is a highly popular one among the teaching profession and so perhaps is an easy sell in coalition/agreement discussions.  I am delighted it is set to be introduced.  That said, it is not a cheap option.  Money will have to be found for this, and additional money at that.  To reach a 25 pupil cap the Welsh Government will have to ensure that schools have an adequate compliment of staff.  This at a time that when class sizes are increasing, partly as a result of schools having to make teachers redundant due to ever constrictive finances.

One of the big pledges from Labour at the election was for an additional £100m investment to improve school standards.  It may be natural to earmark park of that £100m spend for this policy thus seemingly killing two birds with one stone.  Or delivering two pledges with one budget if you will.  I wouldn’t find that a fair proposition.  Given this money was never intended for this purpose it would be slightly disingenuous to mesh these two policies together.  I think it is a reasonable expectation to expect both policies to be delivered in their entirety and separate to one another.

It will also be important to monitor how this policy impacts on other funding streams.  This includes money already set aside for the curriculum review and implementation, the New Deal continued professional development programme and schools challenge cymru, to name but a few.

The other area of interest with the 9 agreed that relates to schools is a review of the school surplus places policy.  This is somewhat ironic given that it is a policy that led to the end of Leighton Andrews tenure as Education Minister.  It will be interesting to see what comes of this, particularly with the emphasis on rural schools in light of much of the unrest in Powys given Kirsty Williams own constituency allegiances.

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